Pacific Islander Families in the U.S.
 
Estimated Number of Printed Pages: 3
 
TOPICS COVERED: This is a brief overview of key facts we've collected on Pacific Islanders living in the United States. The Pacific Islander community is comparatively small and almost a majority of those living in the U.S. have emigrated within the past decade. Therefore, all of the information comes from a recent U.S. Census report, We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States. But we have much, more more elsewhere in The Factbook.
 
 
This information duplicates items from the rest of The Factbook. However, numbers don't mean much without a comparison to family life in other contexts. And that is why we may have included a lot of information on certain issues, but it seems like we have less regional information for others. Actually, that isn't the case – we just chose what were for us notable commonalities or exceptions, cross-culturally. For further information, see the studies we've referenced in the footnotes: they probably have any additional information you might need.
 
 
Links to Sources for this material are available below. Please also see The Factbook Sources page for further information regarding Factbook sources and their availability.
 
 
 
 
861,000
Number of those in the U.S. who identified themselves as Pacific Islander – such as Native Hawaiian or Guamanian – in the 2000 Census. 1.
 
 
 
51 percent
Pacific Islanders in the U.S. are married. 2.
 
 
 
Eight percent
Pacific Islanders in the U.S. are divorced. 3.
 
 
 
56 percent
of Pacific Islanders households are married couple households – slightly higher than the national average (53 percent). 4.
 
 
 
79 percent
of Pacific Islanders households are family households – higher than the national average (68 percent). 5.
 
 
 
44 percent
of Pacific Islanders who are foreign born and in the U.S. arrived between 1990 and 2000. 6.
 
 
 
44 percent
of Pacific Islanders in the U.S. speak a language other than English at home – compared to the national average of 18 percent. 7.
 
 
 
78 percent
of Pacific Islanders in the U.S. 25 years old or higher have a high school degree, just under the national average of 80 percent. 14 percent have a Bachelor's degree or higher, which is lower than the national average of 24 percent. 8.
 
 
 
61 percent
of Pacific Islander women in the U.S. are employed – higher than the national average of 58 percent. 9.
 
 
 
Just over 71 percent
of Pacific Islander men in the U.S. are employed – almost exactly the national average. 10.
 
 
 
17.7 percent
of Pacific Islanders in the U.S. live below the poverty threshold, 5.3 percent higher than the national average. 11.
 
 
 
$31,000
The median income for a Pacific Islander male in the U.S., under the national men's median of $37,100. 12.
 
 
 
$25,700
The median income for a Pacific Islander female in the U.S., under the national women's median of $27,200. 13.
 
 
 
$45,900
The median income for a Pacific Islander family in the U.S., under the national median of $50,000. 14.
 
 
 
Median Income for Pacific Islanders in the U.S.
is lower than the median for Asian households, but it is higher than the medians for Black households, Hispanic households, and American Indian and Alaska Native households and wasn't statistically different from the median for non-Hispanic White households. 15.
 
 
 
Men Under 35
outnumber Pacific Islander women in the U.S. 16.
 
 
 
Women Over 64
outnumber Pacific Islander men in the U.S. 17.
 
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1. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
2. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 7. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
3. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 7. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
4. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 8. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
5. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 8. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
6. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 10. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
7. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 11. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
8. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 12. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
9. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 13. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
10. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 13. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
11. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 7. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
12. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 7. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
13. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 7. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
14. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 7. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
15. Carmen DeNavas-Walt, Bernadette D. Proctor, and Cheryl Hill Lee, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2004, Current Population Reports, P60-229. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 6. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2005pubs/p60-229.pdf
16. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 5. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
17. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 5. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf