Asian-American Families
 
Estimated Number of Printed Pages: 5
 
TOPICS COVERED: This is a brief overview of key facts we've collected on Asians living in the United States. In Population in the U.S., we have a glimpse of information relating to the increase in the Asian population and its migration to the U.S. In Family Structures, we have demographic information of U.S. Asian marriages and families. And, finally, in Financials, we have information regarding U.S. Asians' education, employment, and economic status. And we have much, more more, elsewhere in The Factbook.
 
This information duplicates items from the rest of The Factbook. However, numbers don't mean much without a comparison to family life in other contexts. And that is why we may have included a lot of information on certain issues, but it seems like we have less regional information for others. Actually, that isn't the case – we just chose what were for us notable commonalities or exceptions, cross-culturally. For further information, see the reports we've referenced in the footnotes: they probably have any additional information you might need.
 
Links to Sources for this material are available below. Please also see The Factbook Sources page for further information regarding Factbook sources and their availability.
 
 
 
 

PAGE INDEX:

POPULATION IN THE U.S.
FAMILY STRUCTURES
FINANCIALS

 
 
 

POPULATION IN THE U.S.

 
 
11.9 million
Number of people – 4.2 percent of the total population – who reported that they were Asian in the U.S. 2002 Census. This includes 10.2 million (3.6 percent) who described themselves as Asian alone, and another 0.6 percent who described themselves as Asian and at least one other race. 1.
 
 
 
13.5 million
Number of people reported themselves to be Asian in the U.S. in 2003 – a 12.5 percent growth in three years. 2.
 
 
 
3.08
Average number of people in an Asian household in the U.S., above the U.S. national average of 2.59. 3.
 
 
 
Nationalities / ethnicities with at least one percent of the Asian population in the U.S. –
Asian Indian, Cambodian, Chinese, Filipino, Hmong, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Pakistani, Thai and Vietnamese. 4.
 
 
 
80 percent
of Asians in the U.S. are members of one of five groups: Asian Indian (16.2 percent of the Asian population), Chinese (23.8 percent of the Asian population), Filipino (18.3 percent of the Asian population), Korean (10.5 percent of the Asian population), and Vietnamese (10.9 percent of the Asian population). Each of these has a U.S. population of at least one million people. 5.
 
 
 
Almost four-fifths
of Asians in the U.S. speak a language other than English at home, but about three-fifths of them speak English “very well.” 6.
 
 
 
69 percent
of all Asians in the U.S. are foreign born, compared to the total U.S. population of 11.1 percent. 7.
 
 
 
65.4 percent
of Asians in the U.S. are either native or naturalized citizens: 34 percent are not citizens. 8.
 
 
 
43 percent
of the Asian population in the U.S. entered the country between the years 1990 to 2000. 9.
 
 
 

POPULATION IN THE U.S.
FINANCIALS

 
 

FAMILY STRUCTURES

 
 
 
60.2 percent
of Asians in the U.S. are married – a higher percentage than the national total of 54.4 percent. Certain Asian groups in the U.S. have even higher rates of marriage: 67.4 percent of Asian Indians and 67.0 percent of Pakistanis are married. 10.
 
 
 
4.2 percent
of Asians in the U.S. are divorced – lower than the national total of 9.7 percent. And just as with the higher rate of marriage, there's a lower divorce rate within the Asian population: just 2.4 percent of Asian Indians and 2.1 percent of Pakistanis in the U.S. are divorced. 11.
 
 
 
Fewer female householders without a spouse –
On the average, Asian households in the U.S. have fewer female householder without a spouse than the national figure of 11.8 percent, but that varies significantly between the cultural group. Only 3.8 percent of Asian Indian households in the U.S. have female householders with no spouse; however, 13.6 percent of Filipino householders are females without a spouse. 12.
 
 
 
Two-Thirds
Number of Japanese-American women and Chinese-American women surveyed who had reported that the fact their parents' marriages had been based on responsibility and obligation instead of love, had greatly influence their decision to remain single. 13.
 
 
 
"I don't":
In a study, there were four factors for why Chinese-American and Japanese-American women who were not married: their parent's marriage was not love based, their status as elder daughters who had to care for their family, their educational goals, and their belief that there wasn't anyone appropriate to marry. 14.
 
 
 
Don't want to be their mothers –
Three-fourths of Japanese-American women and Chinese-American women surveyed said that dating Asian-American men was difficult, because the men wanted the women to adopt traditional, submissive gender roles, while the women were looking for men who would share child-rearing and household responsibilities. 15.
 
 
 

POPULATION IN THE U.S.
FAMILY STRUCTURES

 
 

FINANCIALS

 
 
 
44.1 percent
of Asians in the U.S. have a Bachelor’s degree or higher– almost twice the U.S. national rate of 24.4 percent. And Asian Indians in the U.S. have a rate nearly three times the national average: 63.9 percent have graduated from college. 16.
 
 
 
45 percent
of Asians in the U.S. work in management, professional, or related occupations – above the U.S. national rate of 34 percent. Once again, Asian Indians are even further ahead: 59.9 percent are in management, professional, or related occupations. 17.
 
 
 
$57,518 –
Median household income for Asians in the U.S. – which was 117 percent of the median for non-Hispanic White households ($48,977). 18.
 
 
 
$40,700
Median income for Asian men in the U.S. in 2000 – higher than the national median of $37,100. For Asian Indian men, the median income is even higher still: $51,900. 19.
 
 
 
$31,000
Median income for Asian women in the U.S. in 2000 – higher than the national median of $27,200. For Asian Indian women, the median income is even higher still: $35,200. 20.
 
 
 
$9,000
Amount the median income of Asian families in the U.S. in 2000 was higher than the U.S. national median for families ($59,000 vs. $50,000). But it depends on the Asian group: Asian Indian and Japanese median incomes are $70,000, whereas the Hmong median is only $32,400. 21.
 
 
 
53.2 percent
of Asians in the U.S. who are owner-occupiers of their homes, less than the national average. 22.
 
 
 
12.6 percent
U.S. Poverty rate of the total Asian population in the U.S. in 1999, closely compared to the national rate of 12.4 percent. But the rate varied significantly within the Asian community: A whopping 29.3 percent of Cambodians and 37.8 percent of Hmong in the U.S. are in poverty. 23.
 
 
 
1.2 million
Asians in the U.S. are in poverty. 24.
 
____________________________________________________
 
 
1. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
2. ________, "Hispanic and Asian Americans Increasing Faster Than Overall Population," Press Release, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC. Accessed at: (June 14, 2004) on August 15, 2005. http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/race/001839.html
3. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 8. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
4. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 2. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
5. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 4. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
6. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 11. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
7. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 9. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
8. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 9. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
9. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 10. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
10. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 7 (citation omitted). Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
11. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 7 (citation omitted). Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
12. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 9. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
13. Phyllis A. Gordon, "The Decision to Remain Single: Implications for Women Across Cultures." Journal of Mental Health Counseling (January 1, 2003). Archived at: http://www.highbeam.com/library/doc3.asp?docid=1G1:96619856
14. Phyllis A. Gordon, "The Decision to Remain Single: Implications for Women Across Cultures." Journal of Mental Health Counseling (January 1, 2003). Archived at: http://www.highbeam.com/library/doc3.asp?docid=1G1:96619856
15. Phyllis A. Gordon, "The Decision to Remain Single: Implications for Women Across Cultures." Journal of Mental Health Counseling (January 1, 2003). Archived at: http://www.highbeam.com/library/doc3.asp?docid=1G1:96619856
16. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 12. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
17. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 14. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
18. Carmen DeNavas-Walt, Bernadette D. Proctor, and Cheryl Hill Lee, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2004, Current Population Reports, P60-229. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 5. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2005pubs/p60-229.pdf
19. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 15. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
20. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 15. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
21. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 16. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
22. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 18. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
23. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 17. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
24. Carmen DeNavas-Walt, Bernadette D. Proctor, and Cheryl Hill Lee, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2004, Current Population Reports, P60-229. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 11. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2005pubs/p60-229.pdf