Population (General Facts)
 
Estimated Number of Printed Pages: 15
 
TOPICS COVERED: While researching Why Do We Love These People? and The Factbook, we found a general awareness of key population issues was useful, because, while not directly relating to families, it helped us understand families within a larger context. So here are a few of interesting facts relating to the U.S. population and the global population – primarily to show general comparisons and trends. Information about specific racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. is included in the Related Memos. Aging and Children also have additional population information.
 
It's interesting to note that population forecasts are essential – and sometimes, complete fiction. In 1912, a panel of experts warned that the U.S. population was rapidly dying out, and if the nation was to survive, it would be dependent on foreign immigration for its population.* In the 1960s and 1970s, scientists warned that there was a coming "population bomb." There would be so many people, the experts warned, humanity would wipe out the world. They prophesied that by 2000, there could be as many as 6.3 billion people in the world – more than it could handle – and it would be global disaster by 2025. But then after a decade or so, the experts decided population controls had been effective and the bomb wouldn't come – the population would probably only hit 5.4 billion by 2000, so we need not worry so much. The actual world population in 2005 turned out to be . . . 6.46 billion. And now we worry about a "birth dearth" – that our world's population is aging and its numbers are shrinking.
 
 
MEMOS ON RELATED INFORMATION: Birth Rate / Fertility / Family Size, Households, Aging, Children (General Demographics), Asian-American Families, Hispanic-American Families, African-American Families, Pacific Islander Families in the U.S., Industrialization / Urbanization and Migration
 
Links to Sources for this material are available below. Please also see The Factbook Sources page for further information regarding The Factbook sources and their availability.
 

PAGE INDEX:

 

POPULATION, RACE, AND ETHNICITY IN THE UNITED STATES

POPULATION – INTERNATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

 
 

POPULATION, RACE, AND ETHNICITY IN THE UNITED STATES

 

Population Growth in the U.S. Change in the U.S. Population

 
 
Population Growth in the U.S.
 
 
 
 
296,976,031
U.S. population, August 24, 2005. 1
 
 
 
76 million
The U.S. population, in 1900. 2.
 
 
 
281 million
The U.S. population, in 2000. 3.
 
 
 
32.7 million
The growth of the U.S. population in the 1990s – the largest numerical increase of any decade in U.S. history. 4.

 
 
1900-1910
Despite the fact that the 1990s was the decade of the greatest numerical growth, it wasn't the greatest percentage growth for the U.S. population. In fact, it was the third lowest percent increase in the century at only a 13.2 percent increase. In 1900-1910, the population added 16 million – half the 1990s increase – but that meant the total population jumped up 21 percent in just ten years. 5.
 
 
 
23 Percent Larger
The estimated growth of the U.S. population in 2025, compared to 2000. 6.
 
 
 
 
6.0 percent
of the world’s population in lived in the U.S. in 1950. 7.
 
 
 
4.5 percent
of the world’s population in lived in the U.S. in 2000. The percentage of total global population living in the United States has actually declined each decade. So as much as the growth of the U.S. population has been exponential, it's comparatively dwarfed by what is going on in the rest of the world. 8.
 
 
 
 
96 males to 100 females
the ratio of males to females in the U.S. in 2000. 9.
 
 
 
More men than women -
In 2000, the U.S. male population was larger than its female population up for every age group until those aged 30 to 34. 10.
 
 
 
More women than men -
In 2000, starting with those aged 35 to 39, American women outnumbered men– a fact which gets progressively more significant as the men's and women's ages increased. At age 65 and above, there were approximately six million more older women than older men (20.6 million to 14.4 million). 11.
 
 
 
Change in the U.S. Population
 
 
 
The Typical Person in the United States at the Turn of the 20th Century
was male, under 23 years old, and White. He usually lived in a Northeastern or a Midwestern state, in a nonmetropolitan area. He rented a home. He probably lived in a household with five or more other people – since almost half of the population did so. 12.
 
 
 
The Typical Person in the United States at the Turn of the 21st Century
is female, at least 35 years old, and probably White (but much less likely to be so). She lives in a Southern or a Western states, in metropolitan area. She probably owns a home, and she either lives alone or in a household with just one or two other people. 13.
 
 
 
One out of every eight Americans
was of a race other than White at the start of the 20th century. 14.
 
 
 
One out of every four Americans
was of a race other than White by the 20th century's end. 15.
 
 
 
Less Than One Percent
of the U.S. population, from 1900 to 1960, who were people of races other than White or Black. 16.
 
 
 
1.4 Percent
of the U.S. population, in 1970, who were people of races other than White or Black. 17.
 
 
 
12.5 Percent
of the U.S. population who were people of races other than White or Black by the year 2000. 18.
 
 
 
7.9 percent
was the rate of growth for the U.S.'s White non-Hispanic population between 1980 and 2000. 19.
 
 
 
88 percent
was the combined rate of growth for the people of races other than White and people of every race who were of Hispanic origin. That is eleven times the growth of the White population. 20.
 
 
 
36.2 million
people in the U.S. – 12.9 percent of the total population – who identified themselves as Black in the 2000 Census. Of those, the vast majority – 34.4 million reported Black as their only race; the remainder said they were two or more races. 21.
 
 
 
11.9 million
Number of people – 4.2 percent of the total population – who reported that they were Asian in the U.S. 2002 Census. This includes 10.2 million (3.6 percent) who described themselves as Asian alone, and another 0.6 percent who described themselves as Asian and at least one other race. 22.
 
 
 
 
Nationalities / ethnicities with at least one percent of the Asian population in the U.S. –
Asian Indian, Cambodian, Chinese, Filipino, Hmong, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Pakistani, Thai and Vietnamese. 23.
 
 
 
13.5 million
Number of people reported themselves to be Asian in the U.S. in 2003 – a 12.5 percent growth in three years. 24.
 
 
 
80 percent
of Asians in the U.S. are members of one of five groups: Asian Indian (16.2 percent of the Asian population), Chinese (23.8 percent of the Asian population), Filipino (18.3 percent of the Asian population), Korean (10.5 percent of the Asian population), and Vietnamese (10.9 percent of the Asian population). Each of these has a U.S. population of at least one million people. 25.
 
 
 
Almost four-fifths
of Asians in the U.S. speak a language other than English at home, but about three-fifths of them speak English “very well.” 26.
 
 
 
861,000
Number of those in the U.S. who identified themselves as Pacific Islander – such as Native Hawaiian or Guamanian – in the 2000 Census. 27.
 
 
 
Pacific Islander Men Under 35
outnumber Pacific Islander women in the U.S. 28.
 
 
 
But Pacific Islander Women Over 64
outnumber Pacific Islander men in the U.S. 29.
 
 
 
According to the U.S. federal government, "Hispanic" or "Latino" identifies someone as a person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin. Therefore, it's an ethnic identification – not a racial one – so Hispanics can be of any race. 30.
 
 
 
35.2 million
Number of Hispanics in the U.S. as of 2000. That’s 12.5 percent of the total population – a "61 percent increase since 1990. Among the Hispanic or Latino groups, Mexicans were the largest with 20.9 million [59.3 percent]." 31.
 
 
 
39.9 million
Number of Hispanics in the U.S. as of July 1, 2003 – about one-half of the population's growth since 2000. 32.
 
 
 
13 percent
The growth in the Hispanic population since 2000 – while the total U.S. population only increased 3.3. percent. 33.
 
 
 
Less than 22.9 years old
Half of the U.S. population, in 1900. 34.
 
 
 
More than 35.3 years old
Half of the U.S. population, at 2000 – the highest median age in the nation's history. 35.
 
 
 
Children under the age of five
were the largest 5-year age group in the U.S. in 1900 and 1950. 36.
 
 
 
Adults aged 35 to 39 and 40 to 44
were the largest 5-year age groups in the U.S. in 2000 – those being the aging Baby Boomers. 37.
 
 
 
3.1 million
– or 4.1% of the total U.S. population – were age 65 or older in 1900. 38.
 
 
 
35.0 million
– or 12.4% of the total U.S. population – were age 65 or older in 2000. That is a ten-fold increase in the century, which far exceeds the rate of growth of the entire population – which had just tripled in size. 39.
 
 
 
About 47.0
The U.S. average life expectancy at birth in 1900. 40.
 
 
 
About 77.0
The U.S. average life expectancy at birth in 2000. 41.
 
 
 
Over 100
infants would die before their first birthday in the U.S. in 1900. 42.
 
 
 
Less than 10
infants would die before their first birthday in the U.S. in 2000. 43.
 
 
 

POPULATION, RACE, AND ETHNICITY IN THE UNITED STATES

 
 
 

POPULATION – INTERNATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

 
 
 
 
65 years
The global life expectancy at birth, from 2000 to 2005. That's a rise from 47 years in 1950-1955, and it's expected to rise to 75 years by 2045- 2050. 44.
 
 
 
48 years
the life expectancy in Southern Africa – which is a decrease from 62 years in 1990-1995. The cause – deaths from HIV/AIDS. Experts expect that life expectancy there will continue to fall for another ten years – to 43 years – before starting to slowly recover. 45.
 
 
 
95 percent
of all population growth is absorbed by the developing world – so that by the year 2025, the developing world's population is expected to grow by 35 million people annually – with 22 million by the least developed countries. 46.
 
 
 
Five percent
of all population growth is absorbed by the developed world – and by 2050, the population of the more developed countries are projected to decline by about 1 million people a year. 47.
 
 
 
1.2 billion to . . . 1.2 billion
The population of developed countries as a whole and which is expected to remain virtually unchanged between 2005 and 2050. In contrast, the population of the 50 least developed countries is projected to more than double, passing from 0.8 billion in 2005 to 1.7 billion in 2050. 48.
 
 
 
0.8 billion to . . . 1.7 billion
By contrast, the population of the 50 least developed countries is projected to more than double during the same period, from 0.8 billion in 2005 to 1.7 billion in 2050. 49.
 
 
 
6,462,198,041
World population, August 24, 2005. 50.
 
 
 
Two-thirds As Many People
Because of dramatically falling birth rates, in 24 European countries, one generation will be replaced by two-thirds as many people – or less. 51.
 
 
 
One-fifth
of the world's population lives in China. 52.
 
 
 
More than one-third
of the world's population lives in China or India. 53.
 
 
 





Having Under Five Percent of the world's population, United States ranked third in terms of total population size in 2000.

Here's a U.S. Census chart illustrating the changing distribution of the world's population over the last half of the Twentieth Century. 54.


 
Almost half of the global population increase from 1950 to 2000
came from just five countries: the United States, India, China, Nigeria, and Indonesia. 55.
 
 
 
One Percent Decrease
in population is expected in the more developed countries (other than the U.S.) over the next 25 years. 56.
 
 
 
35 Percent Increase
in population is expected in the less developed countries over the next 25 years. 57.
 
 
 
Half the population, but more young children
Nigeria has a total population that is less than half of the United States. But it has a larger population of children under than age of five. 58.
 
 
 
Three percent increase by 2025
The total number of children, globally. will be just 3 percent larger than in 2000. 59.
 
 
 
Nearly doubling by 2025
By 2025, the total number of elderly throughout the world will almost double. That's a percentage increase is three-times the growth of the working-age population. 60.
 
 
 
The US Population is "Older"
When the U.S. population is described as "older" than other nations around the world, that means that it has larger percentages of people in two older age groups– those 65 or older and those 80 or older (known as the "oldest old"). 61.
 
 
 
The US Population is "Younger"
However, unlike most other developed countries, the United States also has a slightly younger population – has a greater percentage of the population of the world's youth. There are primarily two reasons for this. First, U.S. birth rates – primarily driven by the higher rates of recent Hispanic immigrants and their children – are slightly higher than those of other more developed counties . At the same time, about 10 million more people entered the United States than left the country during the 1990-2000 period, which added to the young adult age groups of our population. So, the both reasons for our nation is slightly younger are actually largely the same: immigration. 62.
 
 
 
Eight percent
of the world's elderly live in the U.S. – ranking the nation as having the third largest population of elderly in the world. 63.
 
 
 
Though the U.S. population is only one-fourth of the size of India's, the United States has more people ages 80 and over than India does. 64.
 
 
65.

 
 
 
101 males to 100 females
the ratio of males to females worldwide in 2000. 66.
 
 
 
94 males to 100 females
the ratio of males to females for more developed countries (excluding the U.S.) in 2000. 67.
 
 
 
103 males to 100 females
the ratio of males to females for less developed countries in 2000. 68.
 
 
 
117 males to 100 females
the gender imbalance in China in 2000. For second children born in a family, the disparity was much greater: there were 152 males born to 100 females. 69.
 
 
 
77 years
Average life expectancy for a Japanese man. 70.
 
 
84 years
Average life expectancy for a Japanese woman in 1999. 71.
 
 
43.5
Life expectancy, for a female born in Afghanistan in 2000-2005. 72.
 
 
____________________________________________________
 
* ________, "Decrease in Births Alarms Physicians; In Six States, Dr. Guilfoy Tells St. Luke Society, the Rate Is Lower Than in France," New York Times, New York, NY,  p. 9 (April 7, 1912).  Archived at: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=100358756&sid=6&Fmt=2&clientId=63432&RQT=309&VName=HNP
1. Internet Staff (Population Division), Population Clocks, U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division, Information & Research Services, Accessed at http://www.census.gov/main/www/popclock.html on 8/24/2005
2. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
3. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
4. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), pp. 1, 13. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
5. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 13. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
6. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 10 (internal citation omitted). Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf .
7. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 14. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
8. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 14. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
9. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 10. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
10. Reneé Spraggins, We the People: Women and Men in the United States, Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-20. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC. (2005), p. 2. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2005pubs/censr-20.pdf (PDF file)
11. Reneé Spraggins, We the People: Women and Men in the United States, Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-20. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC. (2005), p. 2. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2005pubs/censr-20.pdf (PDF file)
12. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 3. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
13. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 3. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
14. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 71. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
15. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 71. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
16. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 76. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
17. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 76. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
18. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 76. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
19. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 80. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
20. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 80. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
21. Jesse D. McKinnon and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Blacks in the United States, U.S. Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-25. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2005pubs/censr-25.pdf
22. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
23. Asian Indian, Cambodian, Chinese, Filipino, Hmong, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Pakistani, Thai and Vietnamese. 4. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 2. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
24. Number of people reported themselves to be Asian in the U.S. in 2003 – a 12.5 percent growth in three years. 2. ________, "Hispanic and Asian Americans Increasing Faster Than Overall Population," Press Release, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC. Accessed at: (June 14, 2004) on August 15, 2005. http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/race/001839.html
25. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 4. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
26. Terrance J. Reeves and Claudette E. Bennett, We the People: Asians in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-17. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 11. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf
27. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
28. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 5. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
29. Philip M. Harris and Nicholas A. Jones, "We the People: Pacific Islanders in the United States," Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-26. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (August 2005), p. 5. Archived at: http://www.census.gov./prod/2005pubs/censr-26.pdf
30. Roberto R. Ramirez, We the People: Hispanics in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-18. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-18.pdf
31. Roberto R. Ramirez, We the People: Hispanics in the United States, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-18. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2004), pp. 1, 3. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-18.pdf
32. ________, "Hispanic and Asian Americans Increasing Faster Than Overall Population," Press Release, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC. Accessed at: (June 14, 2004) on August 15, 2005. http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/race/001839.html
33. ________, "Hispanic and Asian Americans Increasing Faster Than Overall Population," Press Release, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC. Accessed at: (June 14, 2004) on August 15, 2005. http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/race/001839.html
44. _________, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision, Highlights, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, United Nations (February 24, 2005), p. viii. Archived at: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/WPP2004/2004Highlights_finalrevised.pdf
45. _________, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision, Highlights, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, United Nations (February 24, 2005), p. viii. Archived at: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/WPP2004/2004Highlights_finalrevised.pdf
46. _________, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision, Highlights, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, United Nations (February 24, 2005), p. vi. Archived at: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/WPP2004/2004Highlights_finalrevised.pdf
47. _________, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision, Highlights, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, United Nations (February 24, 2005), p. vi. Archived at: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/WPP2004/2004Highlights_finalrevised.pdf
48. _________, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision, Highlights, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, United Nations (February 24, 2005), pp. vi-vii. Archived at: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/WPP2004/2004Highlights_finalrevised.pdf
49. _________, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision, Highlights, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, United Nations (February 24, 2005), pp. vi-vii. Archived at: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/WPP2004/2004Highlights_finalrevised.pdf
34. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
35. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
36. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
37. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
38. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, US Government Printing Office,Washington, DC (2002), p.1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
39. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), pp. 1, 7. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
40. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 11. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
41. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 11. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
42. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 11. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
43. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 11. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
50. Internet Staff (Population Division), Population Clocks, U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division, Information & Research Services, Accessed at http://www.census.gov/main/www/popclock.html on 8/24/2005
51. Wolfgang Lutz, “Determinants of low fertility and ageing prospects for Europe,” Family Issues between Gender and Generations, Seminar Report Equality between Women and Men European Commission, Directorate-General for Employment and Social Affairs Unit E/1, European Observatory on Family Matters at the Austrian Institute for Family Studies, (May 2000), p. 49 http://www.europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/eoss/downloads/eu_report_en.pdf
52. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 14. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
53. Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 14. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
54. Source for text: Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf Source of Chart: Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century, US Census Bureau, Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC (November 2002), p. 14. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf
55. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 2. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
56. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 10. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
57. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 10. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
58. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
59. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 10. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
60. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 10. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
61. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 5. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
62. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 5. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
63. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
64. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 1. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
65. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 9. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
66. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 10. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
67. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 10. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
68. Thomas M.McDevitt and Patricia M. Rowe, The United States in International Context: 2000, Census 2000 Brief, C2KBR/01-11. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC (2002), p. 10. Archived at: http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kbr01-11.pdf
69. Arthur E. Dewey, "China: Human Rights Violations and Coercion in One Child," Congressional Testimony Statement of Arthur E. Dewey Assistant Secretary Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, U.S. Department of State Committee on House International Relations, Federal Document Clearing House (12/14/2004). Archived at: http://www.highbeam.com/library/doc3.asp?docid=1P1:103775231
70. That is a 1999 estimate. Junko Kuninobu, "Japan," International Encyclopedia of Marriage and Family, Second Ed. Ponzetti, James J. (ed.), Macmillian Reference USA (2002). p. 969. Available through: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0028656725/qid=1123776640/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/104-0887680-4192712?v=glance&s=books&n=507846 or http://www.galegroup.com/servlet/ItemDetailServlet?region=9&imprint=000&titleCode=M106&type=4&id=174024
71. That is a 1999 estimate. Junko Kuninobu, "Japan," International Encyclopedia of Marriage and Family, Second Ed. Ponzetti, James J. (ed.), Macmillian Reference USA (2002). p. 969. Available through: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0028656725/qid=1123776640/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/104-0887680-4192712?v=glance&s=books&n=507846 or http://www.galegroup.com/servlet/ItemDetailServlet?region=9&imprint=000&titleCode=M106&type=4&id=174024
72. Indralal De Silva, "Demographic and Social Trends Affecting Families in the South and Central Asian Region," Major Trends Affecting Families: A Background Document, Report for United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Division for Social Policy and Development, Program on the Family (May 2003), p. 15. Archived at: http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/family/Publications/mtdesilva.pdf